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Ensono M.O.

Linux Journal - il y a 10 heures 30 minutes

Application performance in hybrid IT environments typically has been a function of simple infrastructure provisioning. This limited approach cannot manage complex resources in real time nor ensure optimal, dynamic application performance, asserts hybrid IT services provider Ensono. more>>

Catégories: Linux News

Understanding OpenStack's Success

Linux Journal - mar, 02/21/2017 - 06:51

At the time I got into the data storage industry, I was working with and developing RAID and JBOD (Just a Bunch Of Disks) controllers for 2 Gbit Fibre Channel Storage Area Networks (SAN). This was a time before "The Cloud". Things were different—so were our users. There was comfort in buying from a single source or single vendor. more>>

Catégories: Linux News

Natalie Rusk's Scratch Coding Cards (No Starch Press)

Linux Journal - ven, 02/17/2017 - 12:02

The phrase "Learn to Program One Card at a Time" plays the role of subtitle and friendly invitation from Scratch Coding Cards, a colorful collection of activities that introduce children to creative coding. more>>

Catégories: Linux News

Own Your DNS Data

Linux Journal - jeu, 02/16/2017 - 09:56

I honestly think most people simply are unaware of how much personal data they leak on a daily basis as they use their computers. Even if they have some inkling along those lines, I still imagine many think of the data they leak only in terms of individual facts, such as their name or where they ate lunch. more>>

Catégories: Linux News

IGEL Universal Desktop Converter

Linux Journal - mer, 02/15/2017 - 11:17

IGEL Technology's next-generation Universal Desktop Converter 3 (UDC3) is a powerful and universally deployable managed thin-client solution, a low-cost alternative to desktop hardware solutions. more>>

Catégories: Linux News

Simple Server Hardening

Linux Journal - mar, 02/14/2017 - 08:12

These days, it's more important than ever to tighten up the security on your servers, yet if you were to look at several official hardening guides, they read as though they were written for Red Hat from 2005. That's because they were written for Red Hat in 2005 and updated here and there through the years. more>>

Catégories: Linux News

Server Technology's HDOT Alt-Phase Switched POPS PDU

Linux Journal - lun, 02/13/2017 - 04:59

Server Technology says that although the engineering challenge was significant—adding per outlet power measurement into its popular High-Density Outlet Technology (HDOT) power distribution unit (PDU) family—product quality and manufacturability were not sacrificed. more>>

Catégories: Linux News

Bash Shell Script: Building a Better March Madness Bracket

Linux Journal - jeu, 02/09/2017 - 09:46

Last year, I wrote an article for Linux Journal titled "Building Your March Madness Bracket" My article was timely, arriving just in time for the "March Madness" college basketball series. more>>

Catégories: Linux News

Reliably generating good passwords

Anarcat - mer, 02/08/2017 - 12:00

Passwords are used everywhere in our modern life. Between your email account and your bank card, a lot of critical security infrastructure relies on "something you know", a password. Yet there is little standard documentation on how to generate good passwords. There are some interesting possibilities for doing so; this article will look at what makes a good password and some tools that can be used to generate them.

There is growing concern that our dependence on passwords poses a fundamental security flaw. For example, passwords rely on humans, who can be coerced to reveal secret information. Furthermore, passwords are "replayable": if your password is revealed or stolen, anyone can impersonate you to get access to your most critical assets. Therefore, major organizations are trying to move away from single password authentication. Google, for example, is enforcing two factor authentication for its employees and is considering abandoning passwords on phones as well, although we have yet to see that controversial change implemented.

Yet passwords are still here and are likely to stick around for a long time until we figure out a better alternative. Note that in this article I use the word "password" instead of "PIN" or "passphrase", which all roughly mean the same thing: a small piece of text that users provide to prove their identity.

What makes a good password?

A "good password" may mean different things to different people. I will assert that a good password has the following properties:

  • high entropy: hard to guess for machines
  • transferable: easy to communicate for humans or transfer across various protocols for computers
  • memorable: easy to remember for humans

High entropy means that the password should be unpredictable to an attacker, for all practical purposes. It is tempting (and not uncommon) to choose a password based on something else that you know, but unfortunately those choices are likely to be guessable, no matter how "secret" you believe it is. Yes, with enough effort, an attacker can figure out your birthday, the name of your first lover, your mother's maiden name, where you were last summer, or other secrets people think they have.

The only solution here is to use a password randomly generated with enough randomness or "entropy" that brute-forcing the password will be practically infeasible. Considering that a modern off-the-shelf graphics card can guess millions of passwords per second using freely available software like hashcat, the typical requirement of "8 characters" is not considered enough anymore. With proper hardware, a powerful rig can crack such passwords offline within about a day. Even though a recent US National Institute of Standards and Technology (NIST) draft still recommends a minimum of eight characters, we now more often hear recommendations of twelve characters or fourteen characters.

A password should also be easily "transferable". Some characters, like & or !, have special meaning on the web or the shell and can wreak havoc when transferred. Certain software also has policies of refusing (or requiring!) some special characters exactly for that reason. Weird characters also make it harder for humans to communicate passwords across voice channels or different cultural backgrounds. In a more extreme example, the popular Signal software even resorted to using only digits to transfer key fingerprints. They outlined that numbers are "easy to localize" (as opposed to words, which are language-specific) and "visually distinct".

But the critical piece is the "memorable" part: it is trivial to generate a random string of characters, but those passwords are hard for humans to remember. As xkcd noted, "through 20 years of effort, we've successfully trained everyone to use passwords that are hard for human to remember but easy for computers to guess". It explains how a series of words is a better password than a single word with some characters replaced.

Obviously, you should not need to remember all passwords. Indeed, you may store some in password managers (which we'll look at in another article) or write them down in your wallet. In those cases, what you need is not a password, but something I would rather call a "token", or, as Debian Developer Daniel Kahn Gillmor (dkg) said in a private email, a "high entropy, compact, and transferable string". Certain APIs are specifically crafted to use tokens. OAuth, for example, generates "access tokens" that are random strings that give access to services. But in our discussion, we'll use the term "token" in a broader sense.

Notice how we removed the "memorable" property and added the "compact" one: we want to efficiently convert the most entropy into the shortest password possible, to work around possibly limiting password policies. For example, some bank cards only allow 5-digit security PINs and most web sites have an upper limit in the password length. The "compact" property applies less to "passwords" than tokens, because I assume that you will only use a password in select places: your password manager, SSH and OpenPGP keys, your computer login, and encryption keys. Everything else should be in a password manager. Those tools are generally under your control and should allow large enough passwords that the compact property is not particularly important.

Generating secure passwords

We'll look now at how to generate a strong, transferable, and memorable password. These are most likely the passwords you will deal with most of the time, as security tokens used in other settings should actually never show up on screen: they should be copy-pasted or automatically typed in forms. The password generators described here are all operated from the command line. Password managers often have embedded password generators, but usually don't provide an easy way to generate a password for the vault itself.

The previously mentioned xkcd cartoon is probably a common cultural reference in the security crowd and I often use it to explain how to choose a good passphrase. It turns out that someone actually implemented xkcd author Randall Munroe's suggestion into a program called xkcdpass:

$ xkcdpass estop mixing edelweiss conduct rejoin flexitime

In verbose mode, it will show the actual entropy of the generated passphrase:

$ xkcdpass -V The supplied word list is located at /usr/lib/python3/dist-packages/xkcdpass/static/default.txt. Your word list contains 38271 words, or 2^15.22 words. A 6 word password from this list will have roughly 91 (15.22 * 6) bits of entropy, assuming truly random word selection. estop mixing edelweiss conduct rejoin flexitime

Note that the above password has 91 bits of entropy, which is about what a fifteen-character password would have, if chosen at random from uppercase, lowercase, digits, and ten symbols:

log2((26 + 26 + 10 + 10)^15) = approx. 92.548875

It's also interesting to note that this is closer to the entropy of a fifteen-letter base64 encoded password: since each character is six bits, you end up with 90 bits of entropy. xkcdpass is scriptable and easy to use. You can also customize the word list, separators, and so on with different command-line options. By default, xkcdpass uses the 2 of 12 word list from 12 dicts, which is not specifically geared toward password generation but has been curated for "common words" and words of different sizes.

Another option is the diceware system. Diceware works by having a word list in which you look up words based on dice rolls. For example, rolling the five dice "1 4 2 1 4" would give the word "bilge". By rolling those dice five times, you generate a five word password that is both memorable and random. Since paper and dice do not seem to be popular anymore, someone wrote that as an actual program, aptly called diceware. It works in a similar fashion, except that passwords are not space separated by default:

$ diceware AbateStripDummy16thThanBrock

Diceware can obviously change the output to look similar to xkcdpass, but can also accept actual dice rolls for those who do not trust their computer's entropy source:

$ diceware -d ' ' -r realdice -w en_orig Please roll 5 dice (or a single dice 5 times). What number shows dice number 1? 4 What number shows dice number 2? 2 What number shows dice number 3? 6 [...] Aspire O's Ester Court Born Pk

The diceware software ships with a few word lists, and the default list has been deliberately created for generating passwords. It is derived from the standard diceware list with additions from the SecureDrop project. Diceware ships with the EFF word list that has words chosen for better recognition, but it is not enabled by default, even though diceware recommends using it when generating passwords with dice. That is because the EFF list was added later on. The project is currently considering making the EFF list be the default.

One disadvantage of diceware is that it doesn't actually show how much entropy the generated password has — those interested need to compute it for themselves. The actual number depends on the word list: the default word list has 13 bits of entropy per word (since it is exactly 8192 words long), which means the default 6 word passwords have 78 bits of entropy:

log2(8192) * 6 = 78

Both of these programs are rather new, having, for example, entered Debian only after the last stable release, so they may not be directly available for your distribution. The manual diceware method, of course, only needs a set of dice and a word list, so that is much more portable, and both the diceware and xkcdpass programs can be installed through pip. However, if this is all too complicated, you can take a look at Openwall's passwdqc, which is older and more widely available. It generates more memorable passphrases while at the same time allowing for better control over the level of entropy:

$ pwqgen vest5Lyric8wake $ pwqgen random=78 Theme9accord=milan8ninety9few

For some reason, passwdqc restricts the entropy of passwords between the bounds of 24 and 85 bits. That tool is also much less customizable than the other two: what you see here is pretty much what you get. The 4096-word list is also hardcoded in the C source code; it comes from a Usenet sci.crypt posting from 1997.

A key feature of xkcdpass and diceware is that you can craft your own word list, which can make dictionary-based attacks harder. Indeed, with such word-based password generators, the only viable way to crack those passwords is to use dictionary attacks, because the password is so long that character-based exhaustive searches are not workable, since they would take centuries to complete. Changing from the default dictionary therefore brings some advantage against attackers. This may be yet another "security through obscurity" procedure, however: a naive approach may be to use a dictionary localized to your native language (for example, in my case, French), but that would deter only an attacker that doesn't do basic research about you, so that advantage is quickly lost to determined attackers.

One should also note that the entropy of the password doesn't depend on which word list is chosen, only its length. Furthermore, a larger dictionary only expands the search space logarithmically; in other words, doubling the word-list length only adds a single bit of entropy. It is actually much better to add a word to your password than words to the word list that generates it.

Generating security tokens

As mentioned before, most password managers feature a way to generate strong security tokens, with different policies (symbols or not, length, etc). In general, you should use your password manager's password-generation functionality to generate tokens for sites you visit. But how are those functionalities implemented and what can you do if your password manager (for example, Firefox's master password feature) does not actually generate passwords for you?

pass, the standard UNIX password manager, delegates this task to the widely known pwgen program. It turns out that pwgen has a pretty bad track record for security issues, especially in the default "phoneme" mode, which generates non-uniformly distributed passwords. While pass uses the more "secure" -s mode, I figured it was worth removing that option to discourage the use of pwgen in the default mode. I made a trivial patch to pass so that it generates passwords correctly on its own. The gory details are in this email. It turns out that there are lots of ways to skin this particular cat. I was suggesting the following pipeline to generate the password:

head -c $entropy /dev/random | base64 | tr -d '\n='

The above command reads a certain number of bytes from the kernel (head -c $entropy /dev/random) encodes that using the base64 algorithm and strips out the trailing equal sign and newlines (for large passwords). This is what Gillmor described as a "high-entropy compact printable/transferable string". The priority, in this case, is to have a token that is as compact as possible with the given entropy, while at the same time using a character set that should cause as little trouble as possible on sites that restrict the characters you can use. Gillmor is a co-maintainer of the Assword password manager, which chose base64 because it is widely available and understood and only takes up 33% more space than the original 8-bit binary encoding. After a lengthy discussion, the pass maintainer, Jason A. Donenfeld, chose the following pipeline:

read -r -n $length pass < <(LC_ALL=C tr -dc "$characters" < /dev/urandom)

The above is similar, except it uses tr to directly to read characters from the kernel, and selects a certain set of characters ($characters) that is defined earlier as consisting of [:alnum:] for letters and digits and [:graph:] for symbols, depending on the user's configuration. Then the read command extracts the chosen number of characters from the output and stores the result in the pass variable. A participant on the mailing list, Brian Candler, has argued that this wastes entropy as the use of tr discards bits from /dev/urandom with little gain in entropy when compared to base64. But in the end, the maintainer argued that reading "reading from /dev/urandom has no [effect] on /proc/sys/kernel/random/entropy_avail on Linux" and dismissed the objection.

Another password manager, KeePass uses its own routines to generate tokens, but the procedure is the same: read from the kernel's entropy source (and user-generated sources in case of KeePass) and transform that data into a transferable string.

Conclusion

While there are many aspects to password management, we have focused on different techniques for users and developers to generate secure but also usable passwords. Generating a strong yet memorable password is not a trivial problem as the security vulnerabilities of the pwgen software showed. Furthermore, left to their own devices, users will generate passwords that can be easily guessed by a skilled attacker, especially if they can profile the user. It is therefore essential we provide easy tools for users to generate strong passwords and encourage them to store secure tokens in password managers.

Note: this article first appeared in the Linux Weekly News.

Catégories: External Blogs

Nventify's Imagizer Cloud Engine

Linux Journal - mer, 02/08/2017 - 10:11

Organizations that rely on compelling imagery to help clients make informed decisions face challenges presenting it appropriately across devices. To assist, Nventify launched Imagizer Cloud Engine, a new cloud-based image manipulation platform that removes the complexities of dynamically delivering best-sized images to end users. more>>

Catégories: Linux News

From vs. to + for Microsoft and Linux

Linux Journal - mar, 02/07/2017 - 05:51

In November 2016, Microsoft became a platinum member of the Linux Foundation, the primary sponsor of top-drawer Linux talent (including Linus), as well as a leading organizer of Linux conferences and source of Linux news. more>>

Catégories: Linux News

Teradici's Cloud Access Platform: "Plug & Play" Cloud for the Enterprise

Linux Journal - lun, 02/06/2017 - 12:51

Teradici's Cloud Access Software and Cloud Access Platform enables enterprises and solution providers to migrate desktops, workstations, workloads, workflows, and graphics-intensive applications to any cloud, public or private – including, for the first time, Linux instances. more>>

Catégories: Linux News

The Weather Outside Is Frightful (Or Is It?)

Linux Journal - ven, 02/03/2017 - 10:03

Blistery cold weather is sinking in, which ought to ignite an instinctual desire to get your house in order and monitor it so the water pipes don't freeze and burst. So, let's take a timely look at a project setting up some temperature probes in various areas, reading them and reporting in a custom dashboard. more>>

Catégories: Linux News

Understanding Firewalld in Multi-Zone Configurations

Linux Journal - jeu, 02/02/2017 - 07:27

Stories of compromised servers and data theft fill today's news. It isn't difficult for someone who has read an informative blog post to access a system via a misconfigured service, take advantage of a recently exposed vulnerability or gain control using a stolen password. more>>

Catégories: Linux News

Linux Journal February 2017

Linux Journal - mer, 02/01/2017 - 14:53
Everything Is Data, Data Is Everything

It doesn't take more than a glance at the current headlines to see data security is a vital part of almost everything we do. more>>

Catégories: Linux News

Montréal-Python 62: Karyokinetic Liberation

Montreal Python - mer, 02/01/2017 - 00:00

It's a new Pythonic year and what could be better than starting it with a Montreal-Python meetup. Come discover different ways of using our favorite programming language.

As usual, snacks will be provided, but eat before, or even better, after by joining us at Benelux so you can network with the speakers and other attendees.

It's also with great joy that we announce that PyCon Canada 2017 will be held at home, here in Montreal. Add it to your calendars! For more information and to stay informed about the upcoming news, visit the PyCon Canada website at https://2017.pycon.ca/.

Presentations Roberto Rocha: GIS with Python: 6 libraries you should know

A quick demo of libraries for doing geospatial work and mapping. The libraries are: geopandas, shapely, fiona, Basemap, folium and pysal.

Jordi Riera: How to train your Python

Let's go back to basics. We will review how to make a python code more pythonic, easier to maintain and to read. A set of little tricks here and there can change your code for the best. We will talk about topics as Immutable vs mutable variables but also about core tools like dict, defaultdict, named tuple and generator.

Rami Sayar: Building Python Microservices with Docker and Kubernetes

Python is powering your production apps and you are struggling with the complexity, bugs and feature requests you need. You just don't know how to maintain your app anymore. You're scared you have created the kraken that will engulf your entire development team!

Microservices architecture has existed for as long as monolithic applications became a common problem. With the DevOps revolution, it is the time to seriously consider building microservice architectures with Python.

This talk will share strategies on how to split up your monolithic apps and show you how to deploy Python microservices using Docker. We will get hands-on with a sample app, walk step-by-step on how to change the app's architecture and deploy it to the cloud.

No longer shall you deal with the endless complexities of monolithic Python apps. Fear the kraken no more!

Where

Shopify Offices 490 de la Gauchetière street Montréal, Québec

When

Monday, February 13th, 2016 at 6pm

We’d like to thank our sponsors for their continued support:

  • Shopify
  • UQÀM
  • Bénélux
  • Savoir-faire Linux
Catégories: External Blogs

Testing new hardware with Stressant

Anarcat - mar, 01/31/2017 - 19:36

I got a new computer and wondered... How can I test it? One of those innocent questions that brings hours and hours of work and questionning...

A new desktop: Intel NUC devices

After reading up on Jeff Atwood's blog and especially his article on the scooter computer, I have discovered a whole range of small computers that could answer my need for a faster machine in my office at a low price tag and without taking up too much of my precious desk space. After what now seems like a too short review I ended up buying a new Intel NUC device from NCIX.com, along with 16GB of RAM and an amazing 500GB M.2 hard drive for around 750$. I am very happy with the machine. It's very quiet and takes up zero space on my desk as I was able to screw it to the back of my screen. You can see my review of the hardware compatibility and installation report in the Debian wiki.

I wish I had taken more time to review the possible alternatives - for example I found out about the amazing Airtop PC recently and, although that specific brand is a bit too expensive, the space of small computers is far and wide and deserves a more thorough review than just finding the NUC by accident while shopping for laptops on System76.com...

Reviving the Stressant project

But this, and Atwood's Is Your Computer Stable? article, got me thinking about how to test new computers. It's one thing to build a machine and fire it up, but how do you know everything is actually really working? It is common practice to do a basic stress test or burn-in when you get a new machine in the industry - how do you proceed with such tests?

Back in the days when I was working at Koumbit, I wrote a tool exactly for that purpose called Stressant. Since I am the main author of the project and I didn't see much activity on it since I left, I felt it would be a good idea to bring it under my personal wing again, and I have therefore moved it to my Gitlab where I hope to bring it back to life. Parts of the project's rationale are explained in an "Intent To Package" the "breakin" tool (Debian bug #707178), which, after closer examination, ended up turning into a complete rewrite.

The homepage has a bit more information about how the tool works and its objectives, but generally, the idea is to have a live CD or USB stick that you can just plugin into a machine to run a battery of automated tests (memtest86, bonnie++, stress-ng and disk wiping, for example) or allow for interactive rescue missions on broken machines. At Koumbit, we had Debirf-based live images that we could boot off the network fairly easily that we would use for various purposes, although nothing was automated yet. The tool is based on Debian, but since it starts from boot, it should be runnable on any computer.

I was able to bring the project back to life, to a certain extent, by switching to vmdebootstrap instead of debirf for builds, but that removed netboot support. Also, I hope that Gitlab could provide with an autobuilder for the images, but unfortunately there's a bug in Docker that makes it impossible to mount loop images in Docker images (which makes it impossible to build Docker in Docker, apparently).

Should I start yet another project?

So there's still a lot of work to do in this project to get it off the ground. I am still a bit hesitant in getting into this, however, for a few reasons:

  1. It's yet another volunteer job - which I am trying to reduce for health and obvious economic reasons. That's a purely personal reason and there isn't much you can do about it.

  2. I am not sure the project is useful. It's one thing to build a tool that can do basic tests on a machine - I can probably just build an live image for myself that will do everything I need - it's another completely different thing to build something that will scale to multiple machines and be useful for more various use cases and users.

(A variation of #1 is how everything and everyone is moving to the cloud. It's become a common argument that you shouldn't run your own metal these days, and we seem to be fighting an uphill economic battle when we run our own datacenters, rack or even physical servers these days. I still think it's essential to have some connexion to metal to be autonomous in our communications, but I'm worried that focusing on such a project is another of my precious dead entreprises... )

Part #2 is obviously where you people come in. Here's a few questions I'd like to have feedback on:

  1. (How) do you perform stress-testing of your machines before putting them in production (or when you find issues you suspect to be hardware-related)?

  2. Would a tool like breakin or stressant be useful in your environment?

  3. Which tools do you use now for such purposes?

  4. Would you contribute to such a project? How?

  5. Do you think there is room for such a project in the existing ecology of projects) or should I contribute to an existing project?

Any feedback here would be, of course, greatly appreciated.

Catégories: External Blogs

My free software activities, January 2017

Anarcat - mar, 01/31/2017 - 19:09
manpages.debian.org launched

The debmans package I had so lovingly worked on last month is now officially abandoned. It turns out that another developer, Michael Stapelberg wrote his own implementation from scratch, called debiman.

Both software share a similar design: they are both static site generators that parse an existing archive and call another tool to convert manpages into HTML. We even both settled on the same converter (mdoc). But while I wrote debmans in Python, debiman is written in Go. debiman also seems much faster, being written with concurrency in mind from the start. Finally, debiman is more feature complete: it properly deals with conflicting packages, localization and all sorts redirections. Heck, it even has a pretty logo, how can I compete?

While debmans was written first and was in the process of being deployed, I had to give it up. It was a frustrating experience because I felt I wasted a lot of time working on software that ended up being discarded, especially because I put so much work on it, creating extensive documentation, an almost complete test suite and even filing a detailed core infrastructure best practices report In the end, I think that was the right choice: debiman seemed clearly superior and the best tool should win. Plus, it meant less work for me: Michael and Javier (the previous manpages.debian.org maintainer) did all the work of putting the site online. I also learned a lot about the CII best practices program, flask, click and, ultimately, the Go programming language itself, which I'll refer to as Golang for brievity. debiman definitely brought Golang into the spotlight for me. I had looked at Go before, but it seemed to be yet another language. But seeing Michael beat me to rebuilding the service really made me look at it again more seriously. While I really appreciate Python and I will probably still use it as my language of choice for GUI work and smaller scripts, but for daemons, network programs and servers, I will seriously consider Golang in the future.

The site is now online at https://manpages.debian.org/. I even got credited in the about page which makes up for the disappointment.

Wallabako downloads Wallabag articles on my Kobo e-reader

This obviously brings me to the latest project I worked on, Wallabako, my first Golang program ever. Wallabako is basically a client for the Wallabag application, which is a free software "read it later" service, an alternative to the likes of Pocket, Pinboard or Evernote. Back in April, I had looked downloading my "unread articles" into my new ebook reader, going through convoluted ways like implementing OPDS support into Wallabag, which turned out to be too difficult.

Instead, I used this as an opportunity to learn Golang. After reading the quite readable golang specification over the weekend, I found the language to be quite elegant and simple, yet very powerful. Golang feels like C, but built with concurrency and memory (and to a certain extent, type) safety in mind, along with a novel approach to OO programming.

The fact that everything can be compiled in one neat little static binary was also a key feature in selecting golang for this project, as I do not have much control over the platform my E-Reader is running: it is a Linux machine running under the ARM architecture, but beyond that, there isn't much available. I couldn't afford to ship a Python interpreter in there and while there are solutions there like pyinstaller, I felt that it may be so easy to deploy on ARM. The borg team had trouble building a ARM binary, restoring to tricks like building on a Raspberry PI or inside an emulator. In comparison, the native go compiler supports cross-compilation out of the box through a simple environment variable.

So far Wallabako works amazingly well: when I "bag" a new article in Wallabag, either from my phone or my web browser, it will show up on my ebook reader then next time I open the wifi. I still need to "tap" the screen to fake the insertion of the USB cable, but we're working on automating that. I also need to make the installation of the software much easier and improve the documentation, because so far it's unlikely that someone unfamiliar with Kobo hardware hacking will be able to install it.

Other work

According to Github, I filed a bunch of bugs all over the place (25 issues in 16 repositories), sent patches everywhere (13 pull requests in 6 repositories), and tried to fix everythin (created 38 commits in 7 repositories). Note that excludes most of my work, which happens on Gitlab. January was still a very busy month, especially considering I had an accident which kept me mostly offline for about a week.

Here are some details on specific projects.

Stressant and a new computer

I revived the stressant project and got a new computer. This is be covered in a separate article.

Linkchecker forked

After much discussions, it was decided to fork the linkchecker project, which now lives in its own organization. I still have to write community guidelines and figure out the best way to maintain a stable branch, but I am hopeful that the community will pick up the project as multiple people volunteer to co-maintain the project. There has already been pull requests and issues reported, so that's a good sign.

Feed2tweet refresh

I re-rolled my pull requests to the feed2tweet project: last time they were closed before I had time to rebase them. The author was okay with me re-submitting them, but he hasn't commented, reviewed or merged the patches yet so I am worried they will be dropped again.

At that point, I would more likely rewrite this from scratch than try to collaborate with someone that is clearly not interested in doing so...

Debian uploads Debian Long Term Support (LTS)

This is my 10th month working on Debian LTS, started by Raphael Hertzog at Freexian. I took two months off last summer, which means it's actually been a year of work on the LTS project.

This month I worked on a few issues, but they were big issues, so they took a lot of time.

I have done a lot of work trying to backport the heading sanitization patches for CVE-2016-8743. The full report explain all the gritty details, but I ran out of time and couldn't upload the final version either. The issue mostly affects Apache servers in proxy configurations so it's not so severe as to warrant an immediate upload anyways.

A lot of my time was spent battling the tiff package. The report mentions fixes for 15 CVEs and I uploaded the result in the DLA-795-1 advisory.

I also worked on a small update to graphics magic for CVE-2016-9830 that is still pending because the issue is minor and we're waiting for more to pile up. See the full report for details.

Finally, there was a small discussion surrounding tools to use when building and testing update to LTS packages. The resulting conversation was interesting, but it showed that we have a big documentation problem in the Debian project. There are a lot of tools, and the documentation is old and distributed everywhere. Every time I want to contribute something to the documentation, I never know where to start or go. This is why I wrote a separate debian development guide instead of contributing to existing documentation...

Catégories: External Blogs

Non-Linux FOSS: Control Web-Based Music!

Linux Journal - mar, 01/31/2017 - 08:26

I like Pandora. I like it because it doesn't require me to know anything other than whether I like the current song. I'm sure other music services offer more features or a larger catalog, but Pandora is simple. So am I. more>>

Catégories: Linux News

SoftMaker's FlexiPDF

Linux Journal - lun, 01/30/2017 - 09:21

Editing PDFs is now as easy as word processing. This is SoftMaker's promise thanks to its new FlexiPDF 2017, a new PDF editor that "masters the creation of new PDF files as well as the editing of text, graphics and drawings in existing ones". more>>

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